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, such as the stubbornly high unemployment, a budget deficit he promised to cut in half by the end of the first term. it is a joyous day for the president but reality will kick in. real fast. chris? >> chris: ed henry reporting from the white house, ed, thanks for that. joining me now is a member of the president's inner circle. senior advisor david plouffe. and, david, welcome back to fox news sunday. >> thanks for having me, chris. >> chris: before we get to the inauguration and the president's second term i want to ask you about this terrorist attack in algeria. what is your latest information on how many americans were taken hostage, what is the status of those americans, and, what does the president think of the way the algerian military handled the situation? >> we have no additional information to report and the state department will do that. this is a reminder countries around the world share a joint threat from the terrorist organization, why we're so active about providing expertise and information and technology, to help them destroy these networks where they exist. and, a reminder, obvio
on long-term deficit reduction, to add muscle to the efforts to bring democrats to the table, they would include a provision in the debt ceiling legislation saying that lawmakers will not be paid if they do not pass a budget blueprint. was it right to step back from challenging the president over raising the debt ceiling? >> well, i think the house proposal is a step in the right direction. no doubt the senate hasn't done it's job. it's been nearly four years since it's passed a budget. but it doesn't go nearly far enough. we have a crisis. i just got back last week from afghanistan. and i had multiple servicemen and women clasp me on the arm and say, please do something about the debt and deficit. we're bankrupting the country. that's what the american people are looking for. and to date, politicians have both parties have been unwilling to take even a tiny step in the right direction. we've got to fix the problem. >> the senate has to pass a budget. do you believe that? >> i do. >> why has it been four years since you've done that? >> well, let me answer this. this was a major victory
term deficit reduction plan." you will recall that standard & poor's did downgrade the u.s. debt last august after the debt ceiling was raised amidst 11th hour suspense. it was blamed on bringmanship to use the debt creeling to get spending cuts. s&p did cite the melodrama as part of the reason but placed emphasis on the view that the debt ceiling deal fall short in what our view would be necessary to stabilize the government median term debt dynamics. translation, the debt ceiling deal didn't do enough about the debt itself. so keep this in mind when you hear it said,be with great certainty it's the republicans trying to force spending cuts over endangering the nation credit rating. as will rogers quoted once, "it isn'tbe what we don't know that gives us trouble. it's what we know that ain't so." bret? >> bret: the president has effectively turned the messaging around. by saying it's about paying the bills that congress has already passed. the laws that it's already passed. republicans are saying it's about borrowing authority. essentially running up the country's credit card. >> exa
would be able to reduce the deficit by $150 billion. not a bad idea. and then if you could do all this and would only cost the average driver less than $1 per week per car, would that be a reasonable burden to impose? so i'm floating the idea. we are beginning discussions with senator mark warner of virginia. he was part of the gang of six, gang of eight. we are encouraged by what we're hearing from him. chairman bill shuster in the house came to our meeting in pittsburgh in november, and he said, listen, folks, we know that the central question congress will have to address next year is revenue. we are open to ideas. no guarantee that they can pass anything. but bill shuster is open to any and all ideas. so what i'm asking you to do is to join us in the battle that lies ahead this next couple of years and demand that congress provide long-term funding for transportation. you know, the big issue that every member of congress is concerned about is with deficits, long-term fiscal viability of the country and cutting spending and raising revenue, that combination is what people seem
thought their one idea, david, was cutting the deficit. >> that's -- they say that's the case, but it really is they want to just talk about spending cuts as if that is going to help the economy. and any mainstream economist now tells you that you may have to do that in some ways for long-term deficit implications but that's not good in the short run. even simpson/bowles say don't cut so fast. >> and just to be clear, it's not at all clear that they actually have coherent plans for anything they're suggesting. they have sort of hand waving spending cuts, entitlement reform without really writing down a specific path to get there. >> incredible. david corn and jared bernstein, gentlemen, thank you so much. stay with us. we'll be right back. what do we want to build next ? that's the question. every day. when you have the most advanced tools, you want to make something with them. something that helps. helps safeguard our shores. helps someone see through a wall of fire. helps those nowhere near the right doctor stand a chance. ... feeling in the extremities ? no. technology can
disproportionately locally driven. cities cannot run budget deficits, so what happens when you something like the great recession. cities all over the country having to scale back if they can't find the budget deficit. that's what you don't want to do this, local employment during an economic downturn. >> even the fiscal cliff to be right about now. >> this is a huge thing. justice program provides grants to law enforcement to hire more police. that program could easily be 20 or 30 times its billion dollars figure size. it would be one of the most productive things the federal government could do to make progress in this area. >> we agree 18 what the professor outlined in the latter part of what he said is to go after illegal gun market among law-abiding people. we're talking about felons on gun violence from the people engaged gun sales illegal under any interpretation of the law. and go after people with records carrying guns illegally. that's been done in cooperation with u.s. attorney in chicago. it's been reasonably good. they think the important thing is to find ways to go after crimina
our debt to g.d.p., our deficit to g.d.p. down around 3%, which is the basis of all economists left, right and center all agree on the areas we can begin to grow as a country. and as my grandfather used to say with grace of god and goodwill of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail now between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they all are today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. unanimitydon't have in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do something. we have to act. and i hope we all agree, there is a need to r
, and a deficit of $1.4 trillion to $1.6 trillion per year. we're spending $1.6 million per year than we're bringing in. >> you've accused the president of using scare tactics. what do you mean by that? do you think he's lying about what could happen? >> the thing is, you know what, first of all it's not congress that determines if we default. it's the treasury so i guess that would be secretary timothy geithner if he's still there. it would be the treasury that would decide but we have enough money to pay the interest on our debt, i believe it's $2.5 trillion comes into the treasury every year. that's enough money to pay the interest on the debt. we're not going to cut off payments to seniors on their social security and medicare, and then the military -- >> you saw what happened the last time when we argued about the debt ceiling. our credit rating was downgraded. that is partisan gridlock. >> that is a massive amount of debt. >> it was because of partisan gridlock. >> i disagree. >> and congress not being able to get its act together. we've seen what can happen. >> congress needs to g
. for decades we have piled for decades we have piled deficit upon deficit, mortgaging our future and our children's future for the temporary convenience of the present. to continue this long trend is to guarantee tremendous social, cultural, political, and economic upheavals. you and i, as individuals, can, by borrowing, live beyond our means, but for only a limited period of time. why, then, should we think that collectively, as a nation, we're not bound by that same limitation? we must act today in order to preserve tomorrow. and let there be no misunderstanding -- we are going to begin to act, beginning today. [applause] the economic ills we suffer have come upon us over several decades. they will not go away in days, weeks, or months, but they will go away. they will go away because we as americans have the capacity now, as we've had in the past, to do whatever needs to be done to preserve this last and greatest bastion of freedom. in this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem, government is the problem. [applause] from time to time we've been tempted to belie
and deficit spending. those are -- >> a balanced way. i'm sure he'll use that language as well. >> a balanced way. opposing goals, but he intends to do them both. >> lynn, do you think we'll hear any talk of energy or climate change at all in the speech tomorrow? >> i do. i think climate change will be an added starter when we look at agenda goals, and i don't know if we had this discussion two months ago, even if curbing gun violence would have been something we would have thought would come up tomorrow. >> yeah. >> but i think that it is -- it is just something that the obama administration did not put a super emphasis on in the last four years and will be something that we'll hear about, in addition to the things that bill talked about. but i think somehow that obama will try to still cast himself as somebody who can try to bring more calm voice to civic discourse. i don't see how it could happen right away, because it didn't happen in the last four years. not sure how he can figure out how to navigate is this time. >> let's listen to some of the other promises made in the president's last
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)